Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Are the Avengers Assemble theme and theme development similar or different to that of Seven Samurai and/or Twelve Angry Men?

51 comments:

  1. The main development in the manuscripts of Seven Samurai, Twelve Angry Men, and Avengers Assemble is the theme of a group of people looking to help other people ensure justice. Iron Man, on page 16 of Avengers Assemble says, “...I was looking around and seeing a bunch of other super heros together against a common enemy and it was very, very exciting.” This theme is shown all throughout each manuscript; The Avengers fighting enemies, The Samurai fighting off the bandits, and twelve frustrated, and heat-exhausted men trying to prove a man not guilty. The development of each theme is slightly different but it is clear that they are all unified in the fact that each character has a sense of justice and the need to fulfill it. Each manuscript shows that one main character has a leading role and a reason to strive for justice for every person. In Twelve Angry Men, Number Eight, even though the vote is eleven to one in favor of guilty, talks over the whole case, and results in swaying the vote a completely unanimous vote (with a little persuasion towards Number Three) in favor of not guilty. In Seven Samurai and Avengers Assemble, these characters are portrayed as Kambei and Captain America respectively.

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    1. I agree with you Jakob. They all share a similar theme and development of the theme of ensuring justice. I believe that this brings up the other side of the matter as well. All of the manuscripts have a sense of injustice that accompanies the "bad guys" so to speak. In 12 Angry men It starts out that most of the jurors don't want to discuss the facts and want to convict the boy immediately on page 4, right before Juror Three states, "I never saw a guiltier man in my life," but as the story continues the jurors lose momentum and they all change their votes to not guilty. In Avengers Assemble, mainly with Kang, the villains take away different people's agency and make them do want the villains want, like on page 43 where Kang is commanding the Egyptians. In Seven Samurai, in the beginning, the bandits are discussing when to raid the village so that they get the crops. This is an injustice to the villagers because they are working only to have their food taken from them.

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    2. I agree with part of your comment Jakob, but I do not agree with the part at the beginning about Twelve Angry Men and how they were trying to prove a man not guilty. I think that it was more they were trying to come to consensus, whether it mean that the defendant was guilty or not. Most of the jurors wanted to go home, and at the end #3 partly agreed just so that they could go home. On page 26, at the end section the play, number 7 says, "Listen, I'll tell you something. I'm a little sick of this whole thing already. We're getting nowhere fast. Let's break it up and go home. I'm changing my vote to not guilty." This shows that some of the people still just wanted to be done with it. I do agree that there was always one character in the manuscripts that sort of led the charge. It even says this in Avengers (Part one) when Doctor Henry Pym says, “Once Captain America became part of the equation it became clear the Avengers were for real. This was going to work.” This shows that they all sort of idolize Captain America and what he stands for.

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    3. Do you think the quest for justice is enough to keep a group together?

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    4. I do not think that the quest for justice is enough to keep a group together. The Avengers eventually split up (in part 2), with Janet Van Dyne and Doctor Henry Pym leaving to pursue other interests. You also have to have common interests and the same commitment level as the other people in the group for it to stay together. Along with that, the group actually has to get along. Even if five people have a very strong need for justice, they could all despise each other with every fiber of their body. It all depends on other circumstances.

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    5. In the stories I have read I do believe it is enough, because once you have fought together you create a bond of friendship. This is solely off of what I have read.

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    6. I think that it all depends. It mainly depends on if the groups are able to cooperate and if their hearts are set on fighting crime. Unfortunately groups don’t usually last. This is because they get into fights and disagreements and eventually get fed up with the rest of the group and leave it.

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    8. In response to Danyon and Emma's comment, I believe that a group actually can be kept together because of the quest for justice. When you make a generalization like this one, there will always be some exceptions, and Hank and Janet represent those exceptions. Overall though, no matter how much a group bickers or disagrees with one another, it will be held together because its members know that what they are fighting for is extremely important and cannot be walked away from.

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    9. I think a common theme similar in seven samurai and the Avengers, in companionship. In Seven Samurai, the band of samurai is together to start to become fiends, but not long enough to become close friends or good friends before the confrontation with bandits. In the Avengers, the group is very good friends with one another and some even consider the Avengers as their second family, like Thor says on page 10 of the manuscript. I feel like the bond is much stronger in the Avengers, but is there nonetheless in Seven samurai. There is almost no bond in Twelve Angry Men, and is much strife, with no friendships, because it is a professional matter. Another theme I see in all three scripts is justice. In Twelve angry men, eight was standing up for the kid, because he wanted fairness and justice. The Avengers are fighting for justice for all the vilans and the samurai are fighting for justice for the village against the bandits. The samurai may also have been fighting for food, because they are poor, but i'm sure justice was a little bit of encouragement to go and help defend helpless villagers against ruffians.

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    10. I disagree with kalyani because I doubt a goup would stay together just for justice. They need som sorte of reward be it fame money or attention

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    11. I do think a quest for justice is enough to keep a group together. If they all believe in fighting for justice then they should all be motivated to stay and fight as one for what is right.

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    12. I agree with Hannah, I think with time that isn't enough to hold a group together but it is a good start. Once a group gets situated enough and goes through enough trails together and become a team, friends, and all that THEN they can use the quest for justice as a guide. Consider the quest for justice training wheels. They still effect the groups path and create patterns but the rider becomes self sufficient.

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    13. **I was originally going to post right after Emma's comment but Blogger wouldn't let me reply, so this response is to Emma's comment right after the question was posted**

      I agree with Emma. I don't think the quest for justice is enough to keep a group together because the group members don't always share a significant connection. Plus, if they stayed as a group forever, they wouldn't be able to lead their own lives and do the other things they could've wanted to do for a long time. Even if they work together to achieve justice, they may not wish to stay friends if they don't share a common interest or significant connection.

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  2. I really love what Jacob said. One thing I loved was the word he said which was "Justice". All stories circulate around this. For 12 angry men they are serving justice to the boy and the whole story is a take on the justice system its self. In the avengers its the super hero's themselves. Super hero's in their core is saving the word and giving justice to the villains that deserve it. And the samurai stand for the same thing, they aren't being given diamonds and riche's and fame. However, they are risking there lives for the better to give justice to those who deserve it. Another theme I saw throughout was perseverance and how most of the characters have had to persevere through a lot. The Seven Samurai all persevered even knowing they were risking there lives and at the end the said. The Farmers won we didn't. After that they now have to persevere through their lives losing more loved ones. In avengers each one left behind a life, for some it was a good life filled with a good career and the had to persevere through the choices they were making in their life.

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    1. I like how you made this connection, however the Avengers are named the "Avengers", so are they avenging of serving justice?

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  3. I believe that, contrary to some of my peers, the collective theme of these manuscripts is not necessarily a group of people originally fighting for a cause, but a person,(or in the cases of Avengers Assemble and the Seven Samurai, multiple people), that can be viewed as a protagonist, rounds up a group of relatively strong-willed and powerful people, (the samurai are trained fighters, The jurors have the power to send a kid to jail and possibly), death row, and the Avengers are literally superheroes), to fight for an important cause, whether the important figures like it or not. Tony Stark makes an accurate testament to this, when, on page 16 of Avengers Assemble, he states, "...I was looking around and seeing a bunch of other superheroes together against a common enemy and it was very, very exciting.”, and,on page 34, Janet Van Dyne says, after what seems like a mission accomplished, "We didn't even have a meeting about it. As soon as we were done with Namor, we all just kind of looked at each other and we all knew what the others were thinking. This guy had to be on the team."

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  5. I believe that the theme is similar to the Avengers, Seven Samurai, and Twelve Angry Men in the sense of justice. We can see this in the Avengers when Doctor Bruce Banner states, “It’s not that there wasn’t plenty of reason for superheroes to gather together and try to find a way to stop the Hulk; of course there would be and there still is.” This shows that the Avengers were seeking a way to make sure Justice was served and there will always be justice to be served. We can also see this in Twelve Angry Men, on page 5 where Number 8 states, “I think maybe we owe him a few words, that’s all”. We can see that Number 8 wants to make sure that we are keeping justice and giving the boy a chance. In Seven Samurai, Katsushiro and a laborer have an argument stating, “Katsushiro: You watch what you’re saying. Labourer: What’s wrong? I’m only telling the truth. Katsushiro: The truth?! Then you ought to be sorry for them.” This shows that Katsushiro cares that everyone is treated fair, and that justice is served. All of this information shows us that the theme in the Avengers, Seven Samurai, and Twelve Angry Men are similar.

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    1. I agree with you Kathryn that justice is one of the themes similar to all of the scripts. Do you think that there is one specific type of justice similar in all three (against racial slurs, against "bad people", etc.)?

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    2. I do think that The Avengers and Seven Samurai have a specific type of justice, which is "bad people" like you said, but Twelve Angry Men have more of a justice for a guilty/innocence type of view, otherwise seen as good and evil.

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    3. I agree with you, but I also think that, for 12 Angry Men, they are fighting against racial slurs. Number 7 has extreme bias against Puerto Ricans, and the others put him in his place.

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    4. I agree with Emma in the fact that during the fifties, racism reached an almost violent peak with pro-segregation people and anti-segregation people gearing up for the biggest civil rights movement of the 1960's.

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  6. The theme and theme development is very similar in all three of the manuscripts. I think that there is one central theme for all three of these pieces of writing. That theme would be tyranny. There is evidence to support this in all three pieces of literature. This is shown in Twelve Angry Men because the court case they are working on is one of murder, which could be seen as a type of tyranny. Also, there are extremely prejudiced men (number 7), and rude/arrogant men (number 3), who tyrannize the other characters (especially the other jurors, like number 11). In Seven Samurai, the bandits are basically ruling the country. The samurai just defeated one group of bandits. There are still a lot of others needing to be taken care of. Finally, the Avengers is about the fight against supervillains (the ultimate tyrranists). Their whole job is to fight against evil. This theme does not mean that every single character in the plays are tyrranistic, but that they are all about the fight against this subject. All three of the scripts are very connected in their central theme, which is tyranny.

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    1. Emma, I disagree with you because while tyranny may be a theme that is present in all three of the manuscripts, it is definitely not the main theme. I think that the main theme in all three of the manuscripts is the pursuit of justice, whether it is the Avengers working together to defeat super villains and protect millions of lives, the samurai working together to defend the village from a horde of bandits, or Juror No. 8 using deductive reasoning to prove that a young man did not murder his father. Almost all of the characters in these three manuscripts believe in doing what is right, so tyranny definitely is not the main theme.

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  7. The three manuscripts are all about people with different backgrounds coming together to solve problems. They involve teamwork and justice. On page 38 of Avengers Assemble, Captain America talks about his hatred for people fighting against freedom. He always stands up for justice. The idea behind the avengers is justice. In Twelve Angry Men, juror 8 spends the entire time questioning the evidence. He wants to make sure justice is upheld. If the jurors let an innocent man be put to death, juror 8 would feel awful because he had committed such an unjust act. The entire US court system is based on justice. Finally, in The Seven Samurai, the Samurai are not fighting for themselves, but for justice. On page 214, Kambei says that the samurai have lost again. He means that justice has won, but not those who were fighting. In Avengers Assemble, men from poor, rich, smart, and average backgrounds join up to fight for justice. On page 16, Tony Stark says how exiting it was seeing many different people fighting together against a common enemy. In Twelve Angry Men, racist, just, lazy, and hot-headed men come together to decide on justice. In Seven Samurai, proud, modest, young, and old come together to win justice.

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    1. I agree with you that a common theme presented throughout each of the manuscripts is people coming together to serve justice, but at the same time, I believe their only purpose behind fighting wasn’t for justice. I think it was a common reason to fight, but there were other reasons behind the characters fighting. For example, in Seven Samurai, the samurai claim the farmers won, and instead of being happy that justice was brought to the occasion, no matter who brought it, they were disappointed that they, the samurai, didn’t win. In Avengers Assemble, the people who came together not only wanted to bring justice to the Hulk, but to help Doctor Bruce Banner control this part of him. Finally, in Twelve Angry Men, a group of jurors were trying to correct the flaws in the justice system but at the same time, they (particularly NO. 8) simply wanted to give the boy a fair discussion and not send him off to die without talking about it. I do agree that a common reason to fight was to serve justice, but there were other reasons behind this as well.

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  8. The theme development of all three of the manuscripts involved an unlikely group of people coming together to serve justice to those who deserve it. In Avengers, it was a group of heroes that came together to protect the public. In Seven Samurai, it was a group of samurai from different towns that formed a group to protect a village of farmers from bandits. In Twelve Angry Men, it was a group of strangers that had to be a jury for a murder case. The jury had to make sure fair justice was served. All of these manuscripts displayed, teamwork, justice, and heroism. In Twelve Angry Men, the heroic act was not sending a not guilty to death. In Avengers Assemble, it was saving the city from aliens and super villains. In Seven Samurai, it was saving the farmers village. The theme developments of these manuscripts are very similar. The Avengers, as a team, save the city, and the world, from several threats, the Samurai work together to fight the bandits, the Jurors, while their heroism may seem small compared to the avengers and samurai, saved an individual from a fate he didn’t he deserve.

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    1. That was very well put; I fully agree with you. Also, that kind of ties in a great number of other stories -- a ragtag group of like-minded (or not) people who must put aside their differences to truly be effective. It really gets you thinking.

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  9. Yes, I believe the theme development of the Avengers Assemble, Seven Samurai and Twelve Angry men all resemble each other pretty closely because in each story a group of people gather together to discuss a problem or retell past events. For example, in Twelve Angry Men they are deliberately gathered there (page 1). In Seven Samurai they purposely go out to gather the samurai and in Avengers Assemble it’s also purposeful. You see several other close themes each varying enough to make the stories seperate like Man Vs. Evil. An example of when Man Vs. Evil is shown in Seven Samurai is in the final battle, towards the very end. But actual physical violence is not the only Man Vs. Evil representation we see, in Twelve Angry Men you see Eight specifically fighting for cause he believes is just: that every man should have a fair trial, even if the person in question actually is guilty. Number Eight shared his opinion and brought up facts that supported him, all along proving a cause in between the lines. Throughout Avengers Assemble many past stories come up about how they fought off the bad guy together and defeated him because they knew what he stood for was wrong.

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  10. In my opinion, the main theme in all three of the manuscripts is the pursuit for justice. The pursuit for justice is represented differently in all three manuscripts, whether it is the Avengers fighting supervillains, the samurai fighting the bandits, or Juror No. 8 using deductive reasoning to prove the innocence of a young man accused of murder. However, the way that this theme is developed in Seven Samurai and Avengers Assemble is slightly different from the way that the theme is developed in 12 Angry Men. In both Seven Samurai and Avengers Assemble, the main characters are super heroes and samurai, which are both very brave kinds of people. They all believe that it is their duty to do what is right and protect the innocent. In contrast, the only character in 12 Angry Men who originally wanted to discuss the murder trial was Juror No. 8, and this is because he wanted to be absolutely sure that the correct verdict was being made (Page 5). Juror No. 8 changed the minds of his fellow jurors because he used pure reasoning to prove that the “eyewitness” accounts were false. Juror No. 8 used his mind in his pursuit for justice, while the Avengers and samurai just used their abilities.

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  11. The are a lot of similarities between these three manuscript’s themes. I believe justice is the perfect word to sum up the similarities in these stories. In 12 Angry Men, juror number 8 goes against the other 11 jurors opinions by saying that this young boy is innocent. Juror number 8 wants to bring justice into the courtroom. In Seven Samurai, seven random samurai come together to fight as one for justice in a small farming community in the middle of nowhere. All these manuscripts have groups or one person fighting for justice in communities. In The Avengers Assemble, Rick Jones gets a group of superheroes to fight for justice on an international scale. Just like juror number 8, Rick gets these heroes together to fight against the evil people of this world even though people thought he was crazy and said it would never work. The seven samurai are like the numerous superheroes fighting as one against a villain. Rick even states himself how he was a stupid teenager just looking for fun and entertainment. He created a world famous group that brought justice to the world one community and one villain at a time.

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  12. ***PLEASE NOTE: I just checked this blog to double check my work and I noticed my post that I entered earlier is not shown. It was supposed to be between the 3rd and 4th post. It appears I have experienced an unfortunate technical error. Therefore, please be advised that this post is supposed to be positioned after the 3rd post and before the 4th post. Sorry for the out of order and confusing placement.***

    I agree with Emma, Jakob, and Danyon's comments, but I want to pose a different perspective. Emma, you danced around this part, but didn't delve into it. I think that all three manuscripts share the same theme development of strangers working with each other, and eventually coming to a unanimous decision or action. So to say that they were working together wouldn't be that accurate. In Twelve Angry Men, in the character descriptions, it clearly shows the variety of personalities in this room. Same with Seven Samurai, throughout the story we get to see that the seven samurai think very differently through their actions and words. The same relation can be made with the Avengers. For example, Tony Stark describes the avengers as, “a bunch of of super heroes fighting together against the common enemy...” Tony says this in the perfect way. By using the word bunch he is giving people the message that these superheroes are just a bunch of people thrown together. So all in all the theme development throughout these three manuscripts is that it begins with a variety of people that can sometimes get in each others way, but in the end they put aside their differences and unite to form a unanimous action or decision.

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  13. One theme that I believe develops through all three of these texts is the theme of hope when things aren’t working out. In the Avengers Assemble this theme pops up multiple times. One example is on page 24 when Nick Fury exclaims, “After Captain America died, and we absolutely thought he did, it was like a part of the world died … He made was want to win. And even in his death, he gave us a focus and direction that absolutely turned the tide of the war...” This isn’t a pure example, but the theme spouts out of it with how it gave them focus and with it came hope. In Seven Samurai the farmers find help in the form of Kambei. On page 29 Kambei says, “I understand. I accept your sacrifice.” This was important for the farmers because at the time they had very little hope of saving their crops, so when Kambei says he will help, it gives them hope that they will be able to save their crops. In Twelve Angry Men hope is revealed when Juror Eight points out, “I got [this knife] last night in a little junk shop around the corner from the boy’s house,” on page 10.

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  14. Prejudice, it doesn’t matter if you're accused of murder. It doesn’t matter who you are. It just matters if you're a puerto rican raised in the slums and accused of murder or a giant green gamaradiactive raging monster trying to destroy an army sent to destroy you first, Prejudice affects everyone. In both the Avengers and 12 Angry Men people assume stuff about you. For the puerto rican it was that he murdered his Dad just because he puerto rican or he was a ‘rebellious’ teenager. For Hulk it was because he was, as stated before, a giant green gamaradiactive rage monster but that was only because people acted on the fears and prejudice and attacked him because he was a giant green gamaradiactive monster. At the very beginning of the story Hulk gets attacked by the Hulkbusters, granted he started it because he was possessed by Loki but who started the starting of it? That’s right, we’re looking at you General Ross. How do you think the stories would be different if there wasn’t any prejudice? Without 3 jumping the gun and assuming the kid is guilty. And with General Ross not shooting nukes at Hulk every 5 minutes.

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    1. Great responce, why do you think this is thoroughly shown throughout these manuscripts?

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  15. Even though the themes throughout the three books are similar, I believe that the themes from the Avengers are similar to the themes in The Seven Samurai over Twelve Angry Men. In the tales, they are both written about several people forming a group to overpower a negative force. Both stories consist of the themes of teamwork and a fight/war. In Twelve Angry Men, it also consist of the fight-type theme because the jurors are arguing over whether the boy did the crime or not. Not to plea Twelve Angry Mens case, but it shows hidden amounts of teamwork, because the jurors are working together to test out the different scenarios that the woman and man threw at him, which had they proven to be fake in the end. The major theme in these three stories, I believe, is the comparison of good vs bad. In Seven Samurai, it’s the Samurai versus the Bandits, in the Twelve Angry Men, it’s the jury versus the boy to begin with, but changes through the topic with the help of reasonable doubt(which is also a theme throughout Twelve Angry Men). And in the Avengers, they had set together the group of superheroes to fight against the evil.

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  16. I think the theme development of the avengers assemble are similar to the other readings. I think this is because there is a group of individuals that become a part of a group, fighting very similar reasons. In each book, there is a form of justice served. The groups of people in the novels feel they need to do what is right. On page 63, chapter 7, in the second party of the Avengers Assemble, it talks about how the avengers group is getting together for more battles, this is also seen in the Seven Samurai script. The samurai get together to fight for the villagers, same as the avengers to help the citizens. In the 12 angry men script, number eight fights for the boy on trial.
    In all three novels, there is a group of people that form a group to make decisions. In Seven Samurai, the samurai agree that the thieves should be “punished” for what they have done. This is the same in 12 angry men, but in the group there is juror 8 who is the main part of giving the justice, and verdict out. And lastly, in the avengers assemble they use their powers together to fight who they consider to be evil.

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  18. The theme development in each of the plots was similar because one of the common themes presented was that people who have never met before can share a connection. The seven samurai, the twelve jurors and the avengers came together to bring justice, and although none of them had met previously, they were able to come together and help who needed it. During the climax of each of each of the storylines, the characters’ connections grew very apparent and it was clear that the group would never forget their experience with that particular group. In Seven Samurai, at the end, although several of them passed at the end, each of the characters made it clear that they were never going to forget the other samurai they worked with unlike the other groups they’d worked with. That particular fight brought them together although they had never met before. In Twelve Angry Men, the jurors, who hadn’t cared much about the case in the first place, were able to think in different ways to come to an agreement and they wouldn’t have given the boy a chance if it weren’t for that. In the avengers, the entire group was able to assist Doctor Bruce Banner and help him control the Hulk.

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  19. I think that the Avengers Assemble theme and theme development are very similar to the other piece of literature because they all have the common theme of comradeship. In The Avengers Assemble on page 62 Pietro Maximoff says “We traveled halfway around the globe and were greeted by the greatest superheros of the world. They took us in. They honored us. They stood next to us and told the world we were heros. They told the world that we were Avengers. We went from outcasts to... this. I remembered looking over at my sister and seeing how happy she was, finally, and thinking it was all worth it.” This quote shows how all the avengers came together to accept Wanda and Pietro even if they didn’t like them and were unsure about them at first. And in 12 Angry Men, in the end they all came together for what they believe in and came together to help No. 8 prove that there is reasonable doubt. Also in Seven Samurai, they all joined together to fight the bandits off for the farmers like on the bottom of page 172, all of the samurai draw their swords in unison ready to fight. These readings all show comradeship as a theme.

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  20. I believe that there are quite a few common themes that run across all of the manuscripts that we have read. One of the most prevalent of these themes is the concept of a group of people with different opinions, ideals, and backgrounds working together towards a common goal. In The Seven Samurai, Twelve Angry Men, and Avengers Assemble, the characters that are brought together into their respective groups are all very different. They think differently, act differently, and believe different things from the other members of their groups. However, despite their differences and the fact that some groups work more cooperatively than others, they all manage to work together and complete the task that they were assigned. There is also a very significant theme of persuasion among all of these stories. In every manuscript there are characters that require very strong and very constant persuasion or argument in order for them to see things the way that is desired by the others. This type of persuasion is more obvious in Twelve Angry Men due to the setting however it is present in the other texts as well whether it occurs in a small way, or large, blatant way.

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  21. Avengers Assemble’s theme is very similar to the themes that run throught the plays Seven Samurai and Twelve Angry Men. I think that teamwork and or brotherhood are very prevalent themes throughout all three workings of literature. Working together is something that prevails strongly in many pieces of literature, but as a main theme in a few stories. Avengers assemble is about a group of superheroes who all join together to make a team, and accomplish a goal as a whole unit. They all band together to try to stop the hulk. In the work Twelve Angry Men there is a whole of teamwork that as the story progresses, the jurors are helping the other members in the jury with the same opinion. This is shown when 11 of the 12 jurors get their opinions changed from guilty to not guilty by a single juror. This theme is also shown strongly in Seven Samurai, the samurai all band together in order to protect a village, the work together to keep all the crops safe, and are willing to sacrifice for the rest of the team. All three pieces of literature strongly show teamwork as a main theme making them all very similar.

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  22. I believe that the Theme and Theme development of Avengers Assemble is similar to that of Twelve Angry Men and Seven Samurai. Seven Samurai, Avengers Assemble, and Twelve Angry Men is about civil service and helping the community in a way. In Seven Samurai, the samurai are a hireable soldier that will fight for your cause and mostly fights for good causes. In Twelve Angry Men the jurors are arguing and discussing the guilt or innocence of a suspected murder and in Avenger Assemble Iron Man, Thor, Ant Man, etc. teamed up to fight the “public menace” hulk. With all of these stories having the same generalized theme, there are still differences in how the theme is portrayed and how detailed the author gets into this portion of the reading. I feel that Twelve Angry Men is focused more on character development than anything else. Avengers Assemble seems to be focused more on saving the day and helping the universe while Seven Samurai focuses on character development but at the same time focuses on theme and really balances the story out.

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  23. I believe that the Avengers is strikingly similar (with themes) to the Seven Samurai, because in both of these stories, a group of average people is trying to get together a group of powerful people, and they end up getting more than they bargained for. In the Seven Samurai, Rikichi and the group of villagers (not necessarily like-minded) that he brought along with him are banding together with a group of samurai; they just needed a few, until one of the first samurai they hired named Kambei says that they’ll need seven to keep the village entirely safe. Similar to the Avengers; the Teen Squad is getting together for a regular meeting, when they send out a contact for the Fantastic Four to help, but they get much more than they thought they’d get when the few people that would become the Avengers intercepted the call as well as the FF. In both of these delightful and timeless stories, it was a tale of how just a few commoners got together a group of powerful people, who would end up taking on their outlook of protecting their neighbors from a great threat, and with little to no requested reward in return.

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  24. The main themes throughout the stories were altogether the most different part of the stories. In Twelve Angry Men a main theme is chaos and order, as sometimes the men were calm, and others they were fuming. he Avengers Assemble book had no real story, but the main theme was unity and the fact that all of the members were uniting. This connection drove the story and made the characters feel like they were one. In Seven Samurai the Samurai do unite, but that is not the main theme. The Samurai are all working together and changing their political views as well. Kikuchiyo especially changed his view on the people of Japan and how they should all be treated. The differences between all of the people in all of the books and their differing backgrounds affected all of the people on different ways like how the mutants found the Avengers and were welcomed, as well as the Samurai and their taking to Kikuchiyo, Kyuzo, and the other Samurai. In Twelve Angry Men all of the characters are from different backgrounds, so there are no chances of 100% agreeing political views, but almost all of the jurors agreed before anything at all.

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  25. I think a common theme similar in seven samurai and the Avengers, in companionship. In Seven Samurai, the band of samurai is together to start to become fiends, but not long enough to become close friends or good friends before the confrontation with bandits. In the Avengers, the group is very good friends with one another and some even consider the Avengers as their second family, like Thor says on page 10 of the manuscript. I feel like the bond is much stronger in the Avengers, but is there nonetheless in Seven samurai. There is almost no bond in Twelve Angry Men, and is much strife, with no friendships, because it is a professional matter. Another theme I see in all three scripts is justice. In Twelve angry men, eight was standing up for the kid, because he wanted fairness and justice. The Avengers are fighting for justice for all the vilans and the samurai are fighting for justice for the village against the bandits. The samurai may also have been fighting for food, because they are poor, but i'm sure justice was a little bit of encouragement to go and help defend helpless villagers against ruffians.

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    1. I agree with Louis companionship is a really important theme because if it wasn't for friendship Seven Samurai Kikichyo wouldn't have saved the town because he wouldn't have been there for the Samurai. So frindship was a very important theme.

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  26. I think a theme in Avengers and Samurai(a little in 12 Angry Men) is Team work. Team work is extremely important and very well known in these stories. Noticeable in the avengers, because they are all working together, to fight something that they are "passionate" about. Also seen in Seven Samurai. The reason why I think its not very known, in 12 Angry Men is because of how they do not have much in common, they don't really know what they can relate to. Also they are not truly "passionate" in what they are arguing/fighting for. Going along with team work, there is friendship, most of it is seen towards the end. Like in 12 Angry Men, the men are arguing and just wanna leave and truly do not care, but towards the end, they learn about each other, and see whats important.(I don't know exactly if they became friends later on). In the avengers they are great friends right away, and they are already like family.

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