Sunday, September 29, 2013

Spiderman Question

Compared to what you originally thought about Spiderman after reading the origin comic, do you think that Spiderman's use of the spiderweb (silk) is plausible?  Justify your answer from your readings and your knowledge of force.

38 comments:

  1. Well we know from experience about spiderman that within his family, especially after Uncle Ben dies, money is tight. Peter Parker even takes up a job at the Daily Bugle to support Aunt May. So I do believe it is physically possible, most of the times. With comics there's always exceptions, granted, for the most part, the basic uses for his web, I think him theoretically using the web is possible. Keep in mind over half the stuff he uses the web for would require the strength of the spider, which is not in question. Though logically, with all the web spiderman goes through, I don't think he could afford it.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I do not think that spiderman's use of silk is plausible. This is due to the fact that the concrete at the end could hold as much weight as the silk itself. It would probably cause the web to fall out of the concrete. If he used an adhesive that could hold as much weight as the the silk could, then it would be more realistic that it currently is. Also, the silk is so thin, it may be difficult for him to shoot a large enough amount at a time to fulfill his purposes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I totally agree with you Nicholas. The fact is also that, if he used a strong enough video, it would remain stuck, and Spiderman would have to cut himself loose.

      Delete
  3. The way that spiderman uses his silk is plausible. It has in fact been proven that spider silk can stop a train. However, I believe that it would not do much good, because the train would have to stop so quickly that the people in the train would not be able to stop with it fast enough and they would all slam their heads against the seats. Some people could still survive, but it seems as though many would be injured or die.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree with this. The shock of the sudden stop would injure/kill many people. However, if they were put in the proper crash position (like it plane crashes), the survival rate would be much greater.

      Delete
  4. I think that the use of Spider Man's web in the comics, holds true to the video`s and readings statements. For example, in the reading, in paragraph 5, it explains that the Darwin's Bark Spider can weave a web with a strength of up to twelve gigapascals. This is enough strength to stop a train going 53 mph, and that means that it can definitely carry Spider Man through the skies of New York. In addition to this, the video on Science of Spider Man states that the web of a spider(1/8 of an inch thick), can stop a bug flying at fifteen miles an hour, which, if upgraded to a width of one inch, is able to stop a fighter jet. These statements back up the fact the Peter Parker would be able to apply a good amount of force to his web, and it not break. In addition to this, the strength that Spider Man's web is scientifically able to hold back a fighter jet, so this explains why Spider Man is able to carry someone while swinging from web to web. So all in all the concept of Spider Man's web is supported by the facts and statements presented in the video and article.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Well I believe that Spiderman's use of spider silk is plausible because in the article about Spiderman it says that the silk could stop a train. That means if it could stop a train it could definatly sling him up a building or onto a lamp post. But the only issue is can a lamp post and other various items with stand that sort of pressure? It all depends on the strength of the item. All in all I think that it is definatly plausible and someone could use the spider silk to sling themselves further than they can jump.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree with you, but when you said that someone can use the Spider Silk to sling shot them selves, that caught my attention. This is because this advanced silk can stops a moving train, and that is a lot of strength, but do you think that something with that amount of strength could be elastic.

      Delete
  6. I believe that Spiderman's use of the spiderweb is plausible because according to the reading of Spider-Man physics, many spider's webs are strong enough to stop a moving train (Spiderman stopped a runaway train using his web) without breaking, and if this is possible, Spiderman can easily use his web to catch a falling person without it breaking. Spiderman can also control the amount of force he applies to his web by pulling it upward in a shorter amount of time. Therefore, he can avoid harming the falling object or potentially killing a falling person.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I think that it would be plausible for spiderman to, say, stop the train if he was properly secured, but for the passengers to survive is very unlikely. As we read in our superhero physics book, such rapid change in motion can cause injury or death. This is shown when spiderman's girlfriend dies even though spiderman caught her with his web before she hit the ground. The point of spiderman is that he saves people, which would be unlikely with his methods. He would be able to swing around and use the web to control his own body, but to stop or pull another person or object wouldn't be as realistic.

    ReplyDelete
  8. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  9. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Since this is a very high grade silk, and is capable of stopping a moving train, it can withstand a lot of tension. So do you think that Spider Man would also be able to with stand this tension. I say this because, after all, he is the one holding onto this web, and it seems like the web is stronger than him. So would his muscles be able to withstand this immense pressure, or would he be dragged along by the train?

      Delete
    2. He might have been dragged along with the train. Even though the silk could have stopped that, Superman's friction would not be great enough to stay in place with the silk.

      Delete
  10. I believe that the thought of spiderman’s silk is plausible it he were to create a synthesized version of a spider’s silk. After reading the origin comic, I thought that the idea of using thread and liquid cement was foolish and completely impossible. The thought of a mere thread holding a full grown man seemed impossible. Now, after reading about the strength of spider silk, I believe that the probability of a better synthetic silk is higher than the chances of thread ever holding someone on a ceiling. The fact that a spider web could stop a train seems improbably, although, after reading about the strength of spider silk, the possibility of such an event could happen. (If we had a superhero that was bitten by a radioactive spider and could shoot webs from his wrists.) I think that the amount of force inflicted on the spiderweb could make it tear before it could stop a train. The amount of tension could eventually break the silk, causing a runaway train or a person dangling from a single thread to be harmed. Spiderman’s silk web is possible, but I do not believe that it is completely probable because of the amount of Newtons inflicted on the threads.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I believe that Spiderman's use of silk is plausible because the video mentions that a strand of silk an inch thick can stop a jet plane, so a strand 1/8 inch thick could definitely stop a person. Also, the article mention that the amount of string used by spiderman can stop a train.

    ReplyDelete
  12. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I believe that Spiderman's use of spider silk is plausible, but not as it is described in the origin comic. The comic's explanation for his "webs" states that they stick to things because the tip of each web is liquid cement. Although actual science pokes many holes in that concept, if Peter Parker were to use actual spider webs, they would function in the same way that his synthetic webs are said to. The silk produced by the Darwin Bark Spider is commonly both long enough and stiff enough to hold human weight and even stop a train as depicted in the second spiderman movie. If Spiderman were to produce and use this type of material, the amazing feats he accomplishes with his webs would be slightly more realistic.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I think the new way is plausible. The silk can hold his weight, and other weight, as proved. Any web made with the spider silk will be able to stop a force coming at it, but it can’t withstand being cut, or being pulled. Another problem would be him keeping his grip on the silk, as well as the silk being able to stay attached to a surface for a long time. while the silk is easily able to withstand to train, it is not able to stay strong enough to be invincible.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I don't think that Spiderman's use of spider-web silk is plausible especially if Peter Parker created the web himself because there is no way he could have created the web as strong as the web from a real spider would be. Another factor to consider is the speed at which Spiderman "spins his web". For example, he could see that the train is nearing a space with no railing and start to spin a web. But could he really make it thick enough AND strong enough before the train arrives, especially with the split second notice he receives? I highly doubt it.

    ReplyDelete
  16. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  17. From what I read from the origin comic, I originally thought that Spiderman’s Spider Web silk was not plausible since he manufactured it himself. Of course he was sciency but, he couldn’t just create and device that gives him never ending web. I never had any doubts concerning the Spider Web silk’s ability to hold things, but that was because I was suspending disbelief. However, after reading the article, I found out that that it is plausible that Spider Man’s silk in fact could hold the falling train from the article, that you don’t have to suspend disbelief. In the article, it tells us that in the scene where Spider Man saves a falling train, the train was going 53 miles per hour and the the webbing would’ve needed to exert 300,000 Newtons to stop the train. This means that the train was also exerting the same amount of force so you would think that it would bounce backward but however it would not. The web creates a cushion for the train and the web being stretchy, it stretches with the train keeping it wrapped up in it’s cocoon as you might say. So Spider Man’s silk is able to hold the train.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I think that it more plausible for Spiderman to use real spider webs than a homemade web shooter. When he uses his homemade web shooters, you have to take into account how the web is going to stay attached to the surface, and how much tension the string can hold before snapping. He states in the Amazing Fantasy #15 comic on page 108, “With some strong liquid cement at the end, I can pull myself up anywhere with my little web.” This gives us proof that their is a strong way to keep the web attached to the surface. His filament would also have to be fairly strong to hold his weight up without snapping. Using real webs that are genetically produced is more plausible because the webs would be made to hold his weight and attach to surfaces. Also, there are spiders that are known to spin webs that can hold back force that is more than one person. Using this silk is not plausible because he would somehow have to gather this silk from the spiders or try to replicate it closely and it is unlikely that he can spin his own webs. To do so he would have to be genetically mutated.

    ReplyDelete
  19. With his original use for the silk just being to pick himself up off the ground and break the fall of another, I highly doubt that the same silk would also be able to stop a train. I mean, given that spider silk has the approximate stopping power of 15 gigapascals (1 pascal = 1 newton applied over an area of 1 meter), which is more than enough to stop a train, we have to remember what Mr. Kakalios said in Chapter 3 of the Physics of Superheroes; "such rapid change in motion can cause injury or death." So even if young Peter slings his webs and does stop the train, he still will have been a mass murderer. Shouldn't he have learned from how he accidentally killed Gwen?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Since you say that slinging a web around this train would cause a sudden stop, I am assuming that you think the web is non-elastic. If I am wrong, sorry, but for now, do you think that it is possible for a substance with this strength to be elastic, thus preventing a rapid change in speed, saving lives.

      Delete
  20. Before the article, I didn't believe that this was possible to swing yourself from buildings, etc etc. It seemed too good to be true. Basically, it was acting as a super-cement, and I don't believe it would be able to dry so quickly, and not like cause havoc itself. After reading the article on what's actually becoming true, it made it a bit more believable, but still not true. Gravity pulls us down at around 9.8 meters a second, which is about 32 feet a second. The advanced silk would stop a train going 53 miles/hour, but after a couple of moments of free falling in the sky, you would exceed the force needed to keep you hanging. So, I believe that you could start swinging, but mid-fall, the silk would break, leaving you to your practical death. My answer is still no.

    ReplyDelete
  21. When I read the Spiderman origin comic, I did not believe that Spiderman's web shooting abilities were very plausible. I feel this way because rather than physically being able to shoot the web from within his body, Peter Parker created his own device that would allow him to shoot out a substance that was very close to that of an actual Spider's web. This web-shooting device is highly implausible because the materials that are used to create the web are string and liquid concrete, and the liquid concrete would just simply not harden fast enough for Spiderman to be able to swing rapidly from building to building. The force that Parker would be putting down on the combination of unhardened concrete and liquid cement would just be too great, and the so called "web" would bring both Spiderman and his web crashing to the ground. However, in the 2002 motion picture, when Spiderman was bitten by the radioactive spider, his DNA mixed with that of the spider’s, and he was actually given the gift of web shooting. This type of genetically engineered webbing would easily be capable of supporting the weight of Spiderman. As shown in the wired.com article, an inch of spider’s silk is capable of stopping the force of a 200,000 pound train moving at a speed of 53 mph. Spiderman obviously weighs less than that, so his abilities to swing from building to building in the 2002 motion picture of Spiderman are much more plausible than that of the original comment.

    ReplyDelete
  22. My first thoughts of the spider-man origins web was that it was highly implausible because It is imposible for a silk string covered in fast drying cement. It woul break the laws of physics for cement to dry as quick. However after reading the "Wired" article my answer partially changed. After reading a spider web is able to stop a train, it may be plausible. Then I remembered the rate at which a person falls at a building exceeds the speed at which a train goes. With this the force applied on one strand of spider string may be ale to withstand the weight of a fully grown man. This leaves my answer at a no. I do not believe it is plausible based on the facts given. Because it would be impossible for spiderman to create a web thick enough and large enough to stop a 200,000 kilogram train when he ways much less then that.

    ReplyDelete
  23. I do not think is web is plausible. We need to remember that he is a teenager boy, he is not a 4 year old boy that weighs like 20 pounds, he probably weighs around 150 pounds. For him to be able to create this silk that can "carry him" and allow him to swing from buildings, seems very not possible. For him to also allow it so it doesn't get tangled or cut on something sharp is very unrealistic.

    ReplyDelete
  24. I do not think that the way Spiderman used silk would be plausible. There is not enough support in the material to be able to shoot straight, without it just flopping around when it exited his contraption. Also, there is nothing to say about how to keep the webs from blowing around in the wind and getting tangled up within itself. Another thing to consider is that if he were to retract the web, it would probably smack him in the face like tape measures when they are suddenly released. Also silk is can still be cut through with a pair of scissors (silk is used for clothing, after all), so his enemies could just cut through the web and free the train. Even though silk may be as strong as concrete, it needs to be able to be cut (like Kevlar) to be of any use. His web could have tiny frays in it (like in ribbon), which, paired with winds, could rip the web in half. All in all, the web would be more of a hindrance than a help to Spiderman. In fact, it probably would be a huge safety violation and Spiderman could not have used it.

    ReplyDelete
  25. I believe that it is in fact possible to use webbing to stop a train, should he have time to put that much webbing on the tracks and if it is secure. The passengers would most likely die though, as the change in force would likely be too much for the human body to handle, as we learned in our book. The force applied to stop their bodies would be massive and break most of the bones in their body. Spiderman would also have to make sure the webs were secure and get most of them down before the train got there.

    ReplyDelete
  26. The observed strength of Spiderman's webs is, in fact, plausible. The students who examined the needed strength of Spiderman's webs concluded that Spiderman actually had a reasonable amount of resistance in his webs when stopping a train filled with 984 people, and traveling at 24 meters per second. In this instance, Spiderman would have needed 3.12 gigapascals of stiffness, and spiders that spin webs are shown to have the ability to produce webs with the elastic stiffness of 1.5 to 12 gigapascals. I have changed my opinion from the thoughts I had about Spiderman's silk when we read the origin story, because from the naked eye, Spiderman's web slinging abilities seem completely unrealistic. Spiderman's overuse of the webs, however, raise some concern. It takes spiders longer than it is shown in the Spiderman comics and movies for arachnids to regenerate silk fluid. In the movies, it is portrayed that they can regenerate by the second, but it is doubtful that that can happen. This would make Spiderman fall from extreme heights every time he swings from buildings at small intervals of time. So, to conclude, Spiderman’s ability to hold webs against large amounts of force is realistic, but his instant regeneration of web silk is unrealistic.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What would be the plausibility that an orphan with no income coming from his dead uncle and unemployed aunt that he could produce a synthetic compound capable of sticking to any surface it comes in contact to? What about having ducts magically appear in your wrists that shoot spiderwebs?

      Delete
  27. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  28. I think that Spiderman's use of the webbing is possible. If those college students figured out that regular webs can hold back trains, then the use of the webbing is almost limitless. If we look at the size of things, a 4 car train is a very heavy object. Of course there are planes and hundred car trains but there are so many things that we could use spiderwebs with. Spiderwebs might be helpful sometimes, but like with Gwen Stacy, you might not be so lucky. If you are going at a high speed, and you stop suddenly, then there is a chance you can snap your neck. Just like how Gwen Stacy died.

    ReplyDelete
  29. I believe that spider mans use of the web is possible. It is plausible that if spiderman had been bitten by a Darwin's Bark Spider then his silk catching and stopping an object in motion. A Darwin's Bark Spider's silk has similar strengths to spiderman's webbing. They both can stop or slow an object moving at a great speed. Newton's first law of motion states that "an object in motion tends to stay in motion,...". Gwen Stacy's death, while tragic, was because of the strength of Spiderman's webbing, perhaps his webbing were not as strong, it might've snapped and simply slowed Gwen Stacy before she plummeted into the water below.

    ReplyDelete
  30. I do think that Spiderman’s use of the silk is plausible, but not effective. Peter Parker’s idea of silk and having it save people is a good idea, and it has been proven to be true, but the sudden stop would at least injure people. This idea would be effective if a ball falling onto a car at a fast pace which would damage the car with people climbing in it, thus the ball wouldn’t have too much damage, but a person would get injured. We can see this in Chapter 3 of “The Physics of Superheroes”, when Gwen Stacy died due to the sudden force stop. Even though she did get “saved”, she got a very serious injury. Also, when Spider-man drops the murderer to the police, the web could have killed him. It might have killed him, but it wasn’t stated. On the other hand, though, you can say that his spider web was effective. One instance of this is when Spider-man wings from flag post to flag posts (building to building). This gets him going to his destination much quicker than just walking, and it does not have a potential injury just waiting to happen. So, I think his use of silk is plausible, but not effective.

    ReplyDelete
  31. I believe that Spiderman and his use of some sort of silk is possible, but nearly impossible. If he were to be one-hundred and twenty-five pounds, for example, he would have to have each individual segment of the silk be able to hold both his mass of 125 pounds and the mass of the string below any given piece of string while swinging, and be able to disconnect from him at his own will. The string would have to be stronger than steel, but able to move easily and be very easy to make, as spiderman has a large amount of it. If he were to get enough string with this ability, then he would also have the extra force of about double on it when he is caught by the silk applying extra pressure to the rope from when he started the fall which seems to be up to about fifty meters. The death of spiderman would be an almost guaranteed improbability, he would fall to his death of die of a concussion or a heart attack. Spiderman would only be possible if the webs were very strong, yet able to disconnect easily, and spiderman was some genetically-altered human, then spiderman could be able to exist.

    ReplyDelete